Grand Canyon Tourism

Each year, over 5,000,000 people visit the Grand Canyon, and those are just the ones who take the time to stay overnight or visit a site and sign the guest register or in some other way leave a record of their visit. That does not cover the people “just passing through” who pull off to the side of the road just to look at the majesty and beauty of the Grand Canyon, to take pictures, or to enjoy a picnic lunch.

If Grand Canyon tourism consistently attracts this many visitors, then something must lure them to the Park. What exactly lures people to the Grand Canyon? Is it the chance to go whitewater rafting, or to ride a burro down to the very floor of the canyon, or camp in the back country; using only what you brought with you? 

No matter what the reasons are, it is a fact that Grand Canyon tourism continues to either hold steady or increase slightly. 

It’s easy to see why people would want to come to the Grand Canyon. The colors of the different layers of rock are incredibly beautiful, and different times of the day will bring out different colors. You can visit two states in one day, because part of the Grand Canyon lies in Arizona and the other part in Utah. Both states allow you to see the Grand Canyon from different perspectives.

A Native American reservation, occupied by the Havasupai tribe is located near the South Rim of the Grand Canyon. They welcome visitors to tour their village, and offer guided trips through the canyon, pointing out things one might otherwise miss and including some history as well.

The back country of the Grand Canyon still has acres of unspoiled wilderness. Only a few camping permits are issued each year, so the area will remain as natural as possible.

Probably the main reason Grand Canyon tourism remains so high is because when you are standing on the rim (or as close to it as you can get) looking out over the Grand Canyon, you are reminded that humans are only a small part of the earth. We are an important part, true, because we are expected to care for it. Seeing so much natural beauty would hopefully inspire us to want to do the best we can to maintain it.

No matter why you go, or want to go, to the Grand Canyon, the fact remains you will probably never forget your trip and always want to go back there again someday.





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